Proceedings of the 2016 International Conference on Humanity, Education and Social Science

The Research of Assessing Liquidity and Operational Efficiency

Authors
Song Gao
Corresponding Author
Song Gao
Available Online August 2016.
DOI
https://doi.org/10.2991/ichess-16.2016.107How to use a DOI?
Keywords
Invested capital,cash equivalent,capital employ,measure of liquidity
Abstract
A firm that can no longer pay its creditors—its bankers and suppliers—is illiquid and technically bankrupt, a situation that no manager wishes to face. Managers must make decisions that do not endanger their firm’s liquidity—a term that refers to the firm’s ability to meet its recurrent cash obligations toward various creditors. A firm’s liquidity is driven by the structure of its balance sheet, namely, by the nature and composition of its assets and the way they are financed. To finance these investments, the firm uses a combination of short-term and long-term sources of funds. One way a firm can manage its balance sheet and en-hance its liquidity is by using the matching strategy. This strategy requires that long-term investments be financed with long-term funds and short-term investments with short-term funds. We show in this chapter that the matching principle helps explain how a firm’s liquidity should be measured and how liquidity is affected by manage-rial decisions.
Open Access
This is an open access article distributed under the CC BY-NC license.

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Cite this article

TY  - CONF
AU  - Song Gao
PY  - 2016/08
DA  - 2016/08
TI  - The Research of Assessing Liquidity and Operational Efficiency
BT  - Proceedings of the 2016 International Conference on Humanity, Education and Social Science
PB  - Atlantis Press
SP  - 502
EP  - 506
SN  - 2352-5398
UR  - https://doi.org/10.2991/ichess-16.2016.107
DO  - https://doi.org/10.2991/ichess-16.2016.107
ID  - Gao2016/08
ER  -