Journal of Artificial Intelligence for Medical Sciences

Volume 2, Issue 1-2, June 2021, Pages 76 - 84

Exploring Medical Students' and Faculty's Perception on Artificial Intelligence and Robotics. A Questionnaire Survey

Authors
Leandros Sassis1, Pelagia Kefala-Karli1, Marina Sassi2, Constantinos Zervides1, *
1 University of Nicosia, School of Medicine, 21 Ilia Papakyriakou Street, 2414, Engomi, Nicosia, Cyprus
2 Biotypos Medical Diagnostic Center, 2 Andrea Papandreou, 15127, Melissia, Athens, Greece
*Corresponding author. Email: Zervides.c@unic.ac.cy
Corresponding Author
Constantinos Zervides
Received 18 January 2021, Accepted 2 June 2021, Available Online 23 June 2021.
DOI
https://doi.org/10.2991/jaims.d.210617.002How to use a DOI?
Keywords
Artificial intelligence, Robotics, Medical students, Medical faculty, Medical education
Abstract

Over the last decade, the emerging fields of artificial intelligence (AI) and robotics have been introduced in medicine, gaining much attention. This study aims to assess the insight of medical students and faculty regarding AI and robotics in medicine. A cross-sectional study was conducted among medical students and faculty of the University of Nicosia. An online questionnaire was used to evaluate medical students' and faculty's prior knowledge and perceptions toward AI and robotics. Data analysis was carried out using SPSS software, and the statistical significance was assumed as p value < 0.05. Three hundred eighty-seven medical students and 23 faculty responded to the questionnaire. Students who were “familiar” with AI and robotics stated that these breakthrough technologies make them more enthusiastic about working in their speciality of interest (p value = 0.012). Also, students (59.9%) and faculty (47.8%) agreed that physician's opinion should be followed when doctors' and AI's judgment differ and that the doctor in charge should be liable for possible AI's mistakes (38.8% students: 47.7% faculty). Although the most significant drawback of AI and robotics in healthcare is the dehumanization of medicine (54.5% students; 47.8% faculty), most participants (77.6% students; 78.2% faculty) agreed that medical schools should include in their curriculum AI and robotics by offering relevant courses (39.5% students; 52.2% faculty). Medical students and faculty are not anxious about the advancements of AI and robotics in medicine. Medical schools should take the lead and introduce AI and robotics in undergraduate medical curricula because the new era needs fully aware healthcare providers with better insight regarding these concepts.

Copyright
© 2021 The Authors. Published by Atlantis Press B.V.
Open Access
This is an open access article distributed under the CC BY-NC 4.0 license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/).

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Journal
Journal of Artificial Intelligence for Medical Sciences
Volume-Issue
2 - 1-2
Pages
76 - 84
Publication Date
2021/06/23
ISSN (Online)
2666-1470
DOI
https://doi.org/10.2991/jaims.d.210617.002How to use a DOI?
Copyright
© 2021 The Authors. Published by Atlantis Press B.V.
Open Access
This is an open access article distributed under the CC BY-NC 4.0 license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/).

Cite this article

TY  - JOUR
AU  - Leandros Sassis
AU  - Pelagia Kefala-Karli
AU  - Marina Sassi
AU  - Constantinos Zervides
PY  - 2021
DA  - 2021/06/23
TI  - Exploring Medical Students' and Faculty's Perception on Artificial Intelligence and Robotics. A Questionnaire Survey
JO  - Journal of Artificial Intelligence for Medical Sciences
SP  - 76
EP  - 84
VL  - 2
IS  - 1-2
SN  - 2666-1470
UR  - https://doi.org/10.2991/jaims.d.210617.002
DO  - https://doi.org/10.2991/jaims.d.210617.002
ID  - Sassis2021
ER  -