Journal of Epidemiology and Global Health

In Press, Corrected Proof, Available Online: 21 February 2020

Evaluation of Noninvasive Respiratory Volume Monitoring in the PACU of a Low Resource Kenyan Hospital

Authors
Kendall J. Burdick1, *, Muchai Stephen Thuo2, Xiaoke Sarah Feng3, Matthew S. Shotwell3, Joseph J. Schlesinger4,
1University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, USA
2Department of Anesthesiology, Kijabe Hospital, Kijabe, Kenya
3Department of Biostatistics, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USA
4Department of Anesthesiology, Division of Critical Care Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USA

Additional information: Adjunct Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering, McGill University, Montréal, Québec, Canada

*Corresponding author. Present address: 1211 21st Ave S #640, Nashville, TN 37212, USA, Email: kendall.burdick@umassmed.edu
Corresponding Author
Kendall J. Burdick
Received 5 November 2019, Accepted 25 January 2020, Available Online 21 February 2020.
DOI
https://doi.org/10.2991/jegh.k.200203.001How to use a DOI?
Keywords
Respiratory volume monitor, post-anesthesia care unit, opioid-induced respiratory depression, respiratory monitoring, respiratory physiology, proactive care
Abstract

This research aims to evaluate the use of the noninvasive respiratory volume monitor (RVM) compared to the standard of care (SOC) in the Post-Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU) of Kijabe Hospital, Kenya. The RVM provides real-time measurements for quantitative monitoring of non-intubated patients. Our evaluation was focused on the incidence of postoperative opioid-induced respiratory depression (OIRD). The RVM cohort (N = 50) received quantitative OIRD assessment via the RVM, which included respiratory rate, minute ventilation, and tidal volume. The SOC cohort (N = 46) received qualitative OIRD assessment via patient monitoring with oxygenation measurements (SpO2) and physical examination. All diagnosed cases of OIRD were in the RVM cohort (9/50). In the RVM cohort, participants stayed longer in the PACU and required more frequent airway maneuvers and supplemental oxygen, compared to SOC (all p < 0.05). The SOC cohort may have had fewer diagnoses of OIRD due to the challenging task of distinguishing hypoventilation versus OIRD in the absence of quantitative data. To account for the higher OIRD risk with general anesthesia (GA), a subgroup analysis was performed for only participants who underwent GA, which showed similar results. The use of RVM for respiratory monitoring of OIRD may allow for more proactive care.

Copyright
© 2020 The Authors. Published by Atlantis Press International B.V.
Open Access
This is an open access article distributed under the CC BY-NC 4.0 license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/).

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Journal
Journal of Epidemiology and Global Health
Publication Date
2020/02
ISSN (Online)
2210-6014
ISSN (Print)
2210-6006
DOI
https://doi.org/10.2991/jegh.k.200203.001How to use a DOI?
Copyright
© 2020 The Authors. Published by Atlantis Press International B.V.
Open Access
This is an open access article distributed under the CC BY-NC 4.0 license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/).

Cite this article

TY  - JOUR
AU  - Kendall J. Burdick
AU  - Muchai Stephen Thuo
AU  - Xiaoke Sarah Feng
AU  - Matthew S. Shotwell
AU  - Joseph J. Schlesinger
PY  - 2020
DA  - 2020/02
TI  - Evaluation of Noninvasive Respiratory Volume Monitoring in the PACU of a Low Resource Kenyan Hospital
JO  - Journal of Epidemiology and Global Health
SN  - 2210-6014
UR  - https://doi.org/10.2991/jegh.k.200203.001
DO  - https://doi.org/10.2991/jegh.k.200203.001
ID  - Burdick2020
ER  -