Proceedings of the International Conference and the 10th Congress of the Entomological Society of Indonesia (ICCESI 2019)

Lactic Acid Bacteria from Honey Bees Digestive Tract and Their Potential as Probiotics

Authors
Nurdjannah Jane Niode, Christina L Salaki, Laurentius J M Rumokoy, Trina Ekawati Tallei
Corresponding Author
Nurdjannah Jane Niode
Available Online 18 May 2020.
DOI
https://doi.org/10.2991/absr.k.200513.041How to use a DOI?
Keywords
honey bees, lactic acid bacteria, gut, probiotic
Abstract

Honey bees (Apis spp.) are social insects that possess unique gut microbiota community. There are three main phyla that dominate the honey bees gut microbiota; Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Actinobacteria in which several species among them belong to the lactic acid bacteria (LAB). In general, some species of LAB can be developed as potential probiotics due to their capability to produce bioactive compounds such as organic acid (lactic acid, acetate acid and formic acid), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), ethanol, enzymes, benzoate, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), free fatty acid, and volatile compounds that in a synergistic action work as broad-spectrum antimicrobials toward several pathogens. Several strains of LAB that living in symbiosis within the digestive tract of honey bees have been isolated, among them are quite promising to be developed as probiotics. Multiple studies have shown the inhibitory effect of LAB from honey bees against pathogenic microorganisms. Formic acid and lactic acid produced by symbiotic LAB could decrease the environmental pH of wounds, therefore prevent the growth of pathogenic microbes. Furthermore, the volatile compound produced by LAB is toxic, while H2O2 in small numbers is needed for optimal wound recovery. LAB capable of producing broad-spectrum antibacterial compounds such as Serratia marcescens, Eschericia coli, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella aerogenes, Salmonella typhi, Pseudomonas spp., Klebsiella spp., Proteus spp., S. aureus, and Bacillus subtilis. Additionally, LAB possess antioxidant activity and to adhere the epithelial cells. This paper aimed to discuss varieties of LAB from the digestive tract of honey bees and their potential as probiotics that could benefit healthcare.

Copyright
© 2020, the Authors. Published by Atlantis Press.
Open Access
This is an open access article distributed under the CC BY-NC license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/).

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Volume Title
Proceedings of the International Conference and the 10th Congress of the Entomological Society of Indonesia (ICCESI 2019)
Series
Advances in Biological Sciences Research
Publication Date
18 May 2020
ISBN
978-94-6252-967-0
ISSN
2468-5747
DOI
https://doi.org/10.2991/absr.k.200513.041How to use a DOI?
Copyright
© 2020, the Authors. Published by Atlantis Press.
Open Access
This is an open access article distributed under the CC BY-NC license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/).

Cite this article

TY  - CONF
AU  - Nurdjannah Jane Niode
AU  - Christina L Salaki
AU  - Laurentius J M Rumokoy
AU  - Trina Ekawati Tallei
PY  - 2020
DA  - 2020/05/18
TI  - Lactic Acid Bacteria from Honey Bees Digestive Tract and Their Potential as Probiotics
BT  - Proceedings of the International Conference and the 10th Congress of the Entomological Society of Indonesia (ICCESI 2019)
PB  - Atlantis Press
SP  - 236
EP  - 241
SN  - 2468-5747
UR  - https://doi.org/10.2991/absr.k.200513.041
DO  - https://doi.org/10.2991/absr.k.200513.041
ID  - Niode2020
ER  -