Proceedings of the 2016 3rd International Conference on Education, Language, Art and Inter-cultural Communication (ICELAIC 2016)

Augustine and Wittgenstein: an Alleged Disagreement on Signs

Authors
Ivan Lapshin
Corresponding Author
Ivan Lapshin
Available Online December 2016.
DOI
https://doi.org/10.2991/icelaic-16.2017.67How to use a DOI?
Keywords
Augustine; Wittgenstein; De Magistro; ostensive theory; reference theory
Abstract
Ludwig Wittgenstein is often described as one of the greatest philosophers of the 20th century and the author of the first comprehensive theory of linguistic reference. Since Wittgenstein is often perceived this way, his theses are usually compared with other philosophers' ideas concerning language as if they were absolutely new. However, some ideas very similar to Wittgenstein's were first formulated much earlier. One of the most prominent pedagogical Augustine's concepts implied that it is impossible to teach someone words using words as well as signs using signs. Nevertheless, Wittgenstein argued with Augustine in one of his works as if the letter was the supporter of ostensive theory. After revealing some historical misunderstandings it becomes clear that there is no contradiction between two great philosophers on these general questions. However, a closer study shows that there is more to the question than it usually seems and there are several important points preceding the concepts of Augustine and Wittgenstein.
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Cite this article

TY  - CONF
AU  - Ivan Lapshin
PY  - 2016/12
DA  - 2016/12
TI  - Augustine and Wittgenstein: an Alleged Disagreement on Signs
BT  - Proceedings of the 2016 3rd International Conference on Education, Language, Art and Inter-cultural Communication (ICELAIC 2016)
PB  - Atlantis Press
SP  - 260
EP  - 262
SN  - 2352-5398
UR  - https://doi.org/10.2991/icelaic-16.2017.67
DO  - https://doi.org/10.2991/icelaic-16.2017.67
ID  - Lapshin2016/12
ER  -