Journal of Epidemiology and Global Health

In Press, Corrected Proof, Available Online: 13 January 2020

Top Ethical Issues Concerning Healthcare Providers Working in Saudi Arabia

Authors
Amar Mansour Almoallem1, Mohammed Abdulaziz Almudayfir1, Yassar H. Al-Jahdail1, Anwar E. Ahmed2, 5, Adnan Al-Shaikh1, 3, 5, Salim Baharoon1, 4, 5, Abdullah AlHarbi1, 4, 5, Hamdan Al-Jahdali1, 4, 5, *
1College of Medicine, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh
2College of Public Health and Health Informatics, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh
3College of Medicine, King Abdullah International Medical Research Center (KAIMRC), Riyadh
4Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Jeddah
5Department of Medicine, King Abulaziz Medical City, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh
*Corresponding author. Email: Jahdalih@gmail.com
Corresponding Author
Hamdan Al-Jahdali
Received 30 May 2019, Accepted 20 October 2019, Available Online 13 January 2020.
DOI
https://doi.org/10.2991/jegh.k.191211.001How to use a DOI?
Keywords
Ethics, bioethics, ethical issues, ethical dilemma, health care, health care professionals, Saudi Arabia
Abstract

Background: Healthcare providers working in Saudi Arabia come from various nationalities, cultures, and training backgrounds. This study aimed to assess the perceptions of healthcare providers working in Riyadh hospitals about ethical dilemmas and solutions.

Methods: This is a cross-sectional study among physicians working in Riyadh’s private and governmental hospitals between June and December 2017. The study collected information on demographics, knowledge about medical ethics, the sources of such knowledge, and common ethical issues in general and the top ethical issues and dilemmas encountered in their daily practice.

Results: A total of 455 physicians from government and private hospitals were enrolled in the study. The mean age of the participants was 34.29 ± 10.5 years, females were 29.7% and mean years of practice was 13.0 ± 11.5. The top ethical issues identified by the participants were “disagreement with the patients’ relatives about treatment” (91%), patient disagreement with decisions made by professionals (84%), treating the incompetent patient (79%), conflict with administration policy and procedures (77%), scarcity of resources (72%), and making decision about do-not-resuscitate or life-sustaining treatment (68%). There were significant differences in dealing with ethical issues in relation to gender, confidence about ethical knowledge, nationality, seniority, training site, and private or government hospitals academic and nonacademic.

Conclusion: Healthcare providers in Riyadh hospitals face multiple ethical challenges. In addition to improvement in ethics knowledge through educational program among healthcare professional, there is a valid need for healthcare professionals and other sectors within society to engage in serious and continuous dialogue to address these issues and propose recommendations.

Copyright
© 2020 Atlantis Press International B.V.
Open Access
This is an open access article distributed under the CC BY-NC 4.0 license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/).

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Journal
Journal of Epidemiology and Global Health
Publication Date
2020/01
ISSN (Online)
2210-6014
ISSN (Print)
2210-6006
DOI
https://doi.org/10.2991/jegh.k.191211.001How to use a DOI?
Copyright
© 2020 Atlantis Press International B.V.
Open Access
This is an open access article distributed under the CC BY-NC 4.0 license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/).

Cite this article

TY  - JOUR
AU  - Amar Mansour Almoallem
AU  - Mohammed Abdulaziz Almudayfir
AU  - Yassar H. Al-Jahdail
AU  - Anwar E. Ahmed
AU  - Adnan Al-Shaikh
AU  - Salim Baharoon
AU  - Abdullah AlHarbi
AU  - Hamdan Al-Jahdali
PY  - 2020
DA  - 2020/01
TI  - Top Ethical Issues Concerning Healthcare Providers Working in Saudi Arabia
JO  - Journal of Epidemiology and Global Health
SN  - 2210-6014
UR  - https://doi.org/10.2991/jegh.k.191211.001
DO  - https://doi.org/10.2991/jegh.k.191211.001
ID  - Almoallem2020
ER  -