Journal of Epidemiology and Global Health

In Press, Uncorrected Proof, Available Online: 25 May 2020

Prevalence, Risk Factors, and Epidemiology of Food-borne Botulism in Iran

Authors
Mohammad Reza Montazer Khorasan1, 2, Mohammad Rahbar3, Abed Zahedi Bialvaei4, 5, Mohammad Mehdi Gouya2, Fereshte Shahcheraghi6, Babak Eshrati1, *
1Center for Communicable Disease Control, Ministry of Health and Medical Education, Tehran, Iran
2Centre of Disease Control (CDC), Ministry of Health, Tehran, Iran
3Department of Microbiology, Iranian Reference Health Laboratory Research Center, Ministry of Health and Medical Education, Tehran, Iran
4Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
5Student Research Committee, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
6Department of Bacteriology and Microbiology Research Center, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran, Iran

Data availability statement: The data that support the findings of this study are available from the corresponding author [BE], upon reasonable request.

*Corresponding author. Email: eshratib@sina.tums.ac.ir
Corresponding Author
Babak Eshrati
Received 4 March 2019, Accepted 1 April 2020, Available Online 25 May 2020.
DOI
https://doi.org/10.2991/jegh.k.200517.001How to use a DOI?
Keywords
Botulism, Clostridium botulinum, epidemiologic surveillance, laboratorial diagnosis
Abstract

Background: Botulism is a severe neuroparalytic disease caused by toxins produced by several Clostridium species. This work presents the surveillance results of botulism in Iran, with the distribution of the cases by regions and by vehicle of transmission.

Methods: We describe the findings of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) surveillance on 2037 suspected cases of food-borne botulism during 2007–2017.

Results: A total of 252 (12.3%) cases were confirmed to food-borne botulism. The mean annual incidence per 100,000 Iranian Natives was 7.1 cases for male individuals and 3.3 cases for female individuals. All botulism events were confirmed to be foodborne. The most commonly implicated food was home-prepared traditional processed fish product, followed by the consumption of commercially canned products and non-pasteurized dairy products. Forty-eight (19%) fatal botulism were reported which, the case-fatality rate declined from 4.5% to 0.7% during the study period.

Conclusion: Laboratory-based diagnosis of botulism is an imperative procedure to elucidate cases, particularly food-borne botulism, to identify toxins in food and confirm clinical diagnosis, helping sanitary control measures. In addition, educational materials related to botulism prevention should be disseminated to different communities.

Copyright
© 2020 Atlantis Press International B.V.
Open Access
This is an open access article distributed under the CC BY-NC 4.0 license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/).

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Journal
Journal of Epidemiology and Global Health
Publication Date
2020/05
ISSN (Online)
2210-6014
ISSN (Print)
2210-6006
DOI
https://doi.org/10.2991/jegh.k.200517.001How to use a DOI?
Copyright
© 2020 Atlantis Press International B.V.
Open Access
This is an open access article distributed under the CC BY-NC 4.0 license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/).

Cite this article

TY  - JOUR
AU  - Mohammad Reza Montazer Khorasan
AU  - Mohammad Rahbar
AU  - Abed Zahedi Bialvaei
AU  - Mohammad Mehdi Gouya
AU  - Fereshte Shahcheraghi
AU  - Babak Eshrati
PY  - 2020
DA  - 2020/05
TI  - Prevalence, Risk Factors, and Epidemiology of Food-borne Botulism in Iran
JO  - Journal of Epidemiology and Global Health
SN  - 2210-6014
UR  - https://doi.org/10.2991/jegh.k.200517.001
DO  - https://doi.org/10.2991/jegh.k.200517.001
ID  - Khorasan2020
ER  -