eFood

Volume 1, Issue 3, June 2020, Pages 217 - 225

Tocotrienols in Bone Protection: Evidence from Preclinical Studies

Authors
Maureen L. Meister1, Huanbiao Mo1, Xiangming Ji1, Chwan-Li Shen2, 3, *
1Department of Nutrition, Byrdine F. Lewis College of Nursing and Health Professions, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30302, USA
2Department of Pathology, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, TX 79430, USA
3Center of Excellence for Integrative Health, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, TX 79430, USA
*Corresponding author. Email: leslie.shen@ttuhsc.edu
Corresponding Author
Chwan-Li Shen
Received 23 December 2019, Accepted 26 April 2020, Available Online 30 April 2020.
DOI
https://doi.org/10.2991/efood.k.200427.001How to use a DOI?
Keywords
Vitamin E, bone strength, animals, cells
Abstract

Osteoporosis is a degenerative bone disease affecting millions, mostly the aging population. Osteoblasts and osteoclasts maintain the balance in bone resorption and formation. Changes occurring in the differentiation, proliferation and activity of these two cell types result in lower bone mass and microarchitecture deterioration, leading to compromised bone strength. Chronic inflammation and oxidative stress disrupt the balance between osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Tocotrienols, vitamin E isoforms with an unsaturated hydrophobic tridecyl chain, reduce oxidative stress and inflammation by downregulating reactive oxygen species, nuclear factor-κB activation and pro-inflammatory cytokines and upregulating the expression of antioxidant enzyme in bone cells. Consequently, tocotrienols increase bone mineralization, promote osteoblast differentiation, and suppress osteoclast formation and differentiation. In vivo studies using various animal models of osteoporosis show improved biomarkers of bone formation and bone strength with tocotrienol supplementation. Tocotrienol-mediated downregulation of the mevalonate pathway that provides substrates for the biological activities of small guanosine triphosphate-binding proteins may also contribute to the regulation of osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Clinical studies are needed to confirm the bone-protection offered by tocotrienols that are found in abundance in plant foods such as fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds and oils, which are also known for their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects.

Copyright
© 2020 International Association of Dietetic Nutrition and Safety. Publishing services by Atlantis Press International B.V.
Open Access
This is an open access article distributed under the CC BY-NC 4.0 license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/).

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Journal
eFood
Volume-Issue
1 - 3
Pages
217 - 225
Publication Date
2020/04/30
ISSN (Online)
2666-3066
DOI
https://doi.org/10.2991/efood.k.200427.001How to use a DOI?
Copyright
© 2020 International Association of Dietetic Nutrition and Safety. Publishing services by Atlantis Press International B.V.
Open Access
This is an open access article distributed under the CC BY-NC 4.0 license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/).

Cite this article

TY  - JOUR
AU  - Maureen L. Meister
AU  - Huanbiao Mo
AU  - Xiangming Ji
AU  - Chwan-Li Shen
PY  - 2020
DA  - 2020/04/30
TI  - Tocotrienols in Bone Protection: Evidence from Preclinical Studies
JO  - eFood
SP  - 217
EP  - 225
VL  - 1
IS  - 3
SN  - 2666-3066
UR  - https://doi.org/10.2991/efood.k.200427.001
DO  - https://doi.org/10.2991/efood.k.200427.001
ID  - Meister2020
ER  -